Pet therapy for children with autism

Interacting with pet animals will be helpful for children with autism. There have been a number of examples of children benefitting from interacting with animals. Dogs and horses are the pet animals commonly used for this purpose.
Studies on the effect of pet therapy on children with autism show generally a positive effect.
Parents must, however, consider sensitivities of their child before considering if a pet therapy would be helpful or not. It is also better not to expect any dramatic improvement in their autism with pet therapy alone.
There are not many places in Bangalore which offer pet therapy as an option for children with autism.
The Paws and Hooves project is an excellent initiative by a group of people of people who are passionate about the potential of pet therapy led by Subhadra Cherukuri who have extensive experience starting from her childhood in working with animals and Rachel Issac who is a physiotherapist. They are innovative and passionate about the potential for pet therapy in children with developmental and other problems.  Please see below brief information and details of their own web site. Pictures provided here are supplied by “The Paws and Hooves Project”
The Paws and Hooves project from Wag-ville is an integrated multi-disciplinary animal-assisted therapy center in Bangalore which provides Equine Assisted Therapy (Hippotherapy or Horse-assisted therapy) and Canine assisted Therapy (dog-assisted therapy) through a team of certified Animal Assisted Therapy practitioners, consulting physiotherapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and neurologists.
Links to their websites for more information
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Importance of Hope

Writing this on a Xmas day (2017) which symbolises the universal hope. Having a child with autism has its ups and downs. It is easy when everything seems difficult or impossible for one to feel so beaten and loose hope.

I have seen a couple who brought up two children with autism and admired their resourcefulness. I asked them “How did you manage to pull through those difficult times?”

Their answer was simple yet most important. Finding hope in even the difficult time by focusing on a small ray of sunshine – a smile that the little Ines had, a small skill that they have recently acquired or something that they have done (even if a small activity) which parents thought that they would never do). They counted on these small things to build up their hope. When I saw them both parents were very elderly having managed to get the two children in to a good supported living place where they have lots of independence, opportunity to work, mix with people but all in a supported and protected environment.

Hope makes what is seemingly impossible possible. Don’t give up that. That is what makes or breaks. Hope comes from faith ( in whatever you believe in), focusing on positive even small positive and supporting each other to do that.

Have a merry Xmas and a happy new year 2018.

Satheesh

Resources for supporting Gifted children with autism 

Gifted children with Asperger’s syndrome: this article is very useful in identifying and responding to gifted children with Asperger’s syndrome.

GBeing gifted and have a special educational needs: an article exploring the needs of children who are gifted and talented while having special educational needs at the same time.

Paradox of giftedness and autism: information for families from the University of Iowa.

Paradox of giftedness and autism: information for professionals from the University of Iowa.

Advocating for your gifted child with autism: This is a very useful,information for understanding how the child could be supported.

Helping Gifted Children with Autistic Spectrum Conditions Succeed.

Twice Exceptional Doesn’t Have To Be Twice as Hard: Experience of a mother and her gifted daughter.

Myths about gifted children busted

Swanand foundation – nurturing gifted children, a pune based organisation providing information and support to gifted children. This organisation is not specific to children with autism though.

Mind Springs – An organisation started by Usha Pandit, a renowned educationalist. This organisation is Mumbai based.